Fort Kochi Tourism

Fort Kochi is one of the three main urban regions that constitute the present day Kochi city in Kerala. The other two regions together comprising the Kochi city are Mattancherry and Ernakulam. Fort Cochin is counted among the major tourist attractions of present day Kochi in Kerala, but it was earlier a fishing village of no significance during the pre-colonial Kerala. It was christened as Fort Kochi after this territory was given to the Portuguese in the year 1503 by the Raja of Kochi. The Raja gave the Portuguese the permission to build a fort near the waterfront to protect their commercial interests. Since Cochin in Kerala was an important trading zone for foreign travelers and seafarers, the ownership of the Fort Kochi region passed many hands. Main tourist attractions of Fort Kochi are:

Chinese Fishing Nets/Vasco Da Gamma Square: These huge cantilevered fishing nets are the legacy of one of the first visitors to Malabar Coast. Erected here between 1350 and 1450 AD by traders from the Court of Kubla Khan, these nets are set up on teak wood and bamboo poles. The best place to watch the net being lowered into the sea and catch being brought in is Vasco Da Gamma square, a narrow promenade that runs along the Beach. The square is an ideal place to idle with stalls serving fresh delicious sea food and tender coconuts.

Fort Kochi Beach: Fort Kochi is one of the three main urban regions that constitute the present day Kochi city in Kerala. The other two regions together comprising the Kochi city are Mattancherry and Ernakulam. Fort Cochin is counted among the major tourist attractions of present day Kochi in Kerala, but it was earlier a fishing village of no significance during the pre-colonial Kerala.

St. Francis Church: It is the oldest church built by Europeans in India. On his 3rd visit to Kerala, Vasco Da Gama, the Portuguese trader who reached India from Europe by sea, fell ill and died in Kochi. He was buried in the St. Francis Church. Later his remains were taken back to Portugal. In spite of that, his burial spot inside the church has been clearly marked out.

Vasco House: Vasco house, located on Rose Street, is believed to be one of the oldest Portuguese houses in India. Vasco Da Gama is believed to have lived here. This house features European glass paned windows and verandahs. Pierce Leslie Bungalow: This charming Mansion was the office of Pierce Leslie & Co., coffee merchants, founded in 1862. A representative of Fort Cochin Colonial Bungalow, this building reflects Portuguese, Dutch and local influences. Characteristic features are wood panels that form the roof of ground floor, arched doorways, carved doors and sprawling rooms. Water front verandas are always an added attraction to such houses.

Old Harbor House: This house that was once a boat house and built in 1808 is in the possession of Carrit Moran & Co., renowned Tea brokers, who now use it as their residence.

Koder House: This magnificent building constructed by Samuel. S. Koder of the Cochin Electric Company in 1808 is a supreme example of transition from colonial to Indo-European Architecture. Features like Veranda Seats at the entrance, floor tiles set in a chess board pattern, red colored brick like fašade, carved wood furniture and a wooden bridge connecting to a separate structure across the street are unique to this Bungalow.

Delta Study: Once a warehouse, this heritage Bungalow built in 1808 is presently a high school with the same name.

The Dutch Cemetery: The tomb stones here are the most authentic records of the hundreds of Europeans who left their homeland on a mission to expand their colonial empires and changed the course of history of this land. The cemetery was consecrated in 1724 and is today managed by the Church of South India.

Santa Cruz Basilica: The original church, situated in Fort Kochi, was built by the Portuguese in 1505 and named as a cathedral in 1558. The British colonists destroyed the cathedral in 1795. The current structure was built in 1905 and raised to the status of a basilica by Pope John Paul II in 1984.



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